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cinephilearchive:

Tony Gilroy, one of Hollywood’s most sought-after screenwriters, is responsible for The Devil’s Advocate, Armageddon and the Bourne films, to name just a few. Alison Feeney-Hart met the man whose 2007 film Michael Clayton saw him receive Bafta and Oscar nominations for best original screenplay to find out his Top 10 tips for writing a Hollywood blockbuster.
Go to the movies
“I don’t think there is anything you can learn from courses or books. You have been watching movies since you were born. You have filled your life with narrative… and food. It’s already way down deep inside you. Going to the movies, having something to say, having an imagination and the ambition to do it is really all that is required. You can learn how to do anything.”
Make stuff up but keep it real
“This is imaginative work — screenwriters make things up. Everything I have in my life is a result of making things up. There is one thing that you have to know that is a deal-breaker — human behaviour. The quality of your writing will be directly related to your understanding of human behaviour. You need to become a journalist for the movie that is in your head. You need to report on it; every scene has to be real.”
Start small
“Big ideas don’t work. Start with a very small idea that you can build on. With Bourne I never read any of the books; we started again. The very smallest thing with [Jason] Bourne was, ‘If I don’t know who I am and I don’t know where I’m from, perhaps I can identify who I am by what I know how to do.’ We built a whole new world around that small idea. You just start small, you build out and you move one step after the next and that’s how you write a Hollywood movie.”
Learn to live by your wits
“My father was a screenwriter but it’s not some pixie dust creative family thing. I learned from watching how hard he worked and learned about the tempo of a writer’s life — you have to live by your wits. If you are living with someone who lives by their wits, it seems normal to you, it doesn’t scare you as much and you understand the rhythms of it.”
Write for TV
“It’s getting harder and harder to make good movies. TV is where the ambiguity and shades of reality live, it’s where stories can be interesting. A lot of writers are very excited about TV right now and it’s a writer-controlled business. When writers are in control, good things happen. They are more rational, they are hardworking, they are more benevolent. Every time writers have been put in charge of entertainment, things have worked out, so with TV maybe we will see a writer-driven utopia.”

Learn to write anywhere, anytime
“I have an office at home, I’ve written in a million hotel rooms, I can write anywhere now. My whole goal is to want to be at my desk. If the writing is going well, I don’t want to quit. I’m older and wise enough now that if something is going well, I don’t stop. I call and say I’m not coming home for dinner and just keep going. More than anything else, I want to want to go to my desk and to not be afraid of going to work.”
Get a job
“I spent six years tending bar while I figured out how to write screenplays. If you want to write, if you are a young writer and nobody knows you, find a job that pays you the most amount of money for the least amount of hours, so that you have the most amount of time left over to write. You want to live some place where you have some sort of cultural connection and can see as many films and be around as many people as possible. You want to be some place where you can just write and write and write.”
Get a life
“If you don’t have anything to say and if you haven’t done anything except see a bunch of movies, then what’s the point? You can only write what you know about and that will either limit you or open the possibilities to everything. Be interested in lots of things and stay interested. My knowledge is very wide and incredibly thin. It’s much more interesting when journalists and cops and doctors and bankers become screenwriters than 20-year-old film students. There are some exceptions, of course, but if you don’t have anything to say, then why are you here?”
Don’t live in Los Angeles
“I don’t think there is any reason to live there, I think LA is probably very bad for you. It’s a bad place to feed your head. In LA you are driving around all the time, surrounded by people who are making you depressed. I don’t think Hollywood really helps a young writer feel any sense of romance about their life. Even if it’s a delusion, you want to feel special when you go to work in the morning.”
Develop a thick skin and just keep going
“I have assumed both positions of the Hollywood Kama Sutra - top and bottom. It’s very important to be able to handle rejection. I think one of the reasons writers are shy is because we are all very suspicious of our own process because it fails so often. It’s no different from being a novelist or a composer or a painter. When you get rejection from the outside world, you either move on or you don’t. But I think the hardest times are all the days when nothing happens and everybody who has ever written anything knows what I’m talking about. A great day of writing tops everything.”
Tony Gilroy explain his simple rules for writing an original screenplay in his BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture from September 29, 2013.
 
Read, learn, and absorb: Tony Gilroy’s screenplay for the Michael Clayton [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

This is required listening, Steven Soderbergh and Tony Gilroy discuss one of their favorite films, The Third Man directed by Carol Reed. This track was recorded exclusively for the Criterion Collection in 2007.


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Thanks to Chris Chibnall for the heads up
Follow @LaFamiliaFilm

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cinephilearchive:

Tony Gilroy, one of Hollywood’s most sought-after screenwriters, is responsible for The Devil’s Advocate, Armageddon and the Bourne films, to name just a few. Alison Feeney-Hart met the man whose 2007 film Michael Clayton saw him receive Bafta and Oscar nominations for best original screenplay to find out his Top 10 tips for writing a Hollywood blockbuster.

Go to the movies

“I don’t think there is anything you can learn from courses or books. You have been watching movies since you were born. You have filled your life with narrative… and food. It’s already way down deep inside you. Going to the movies, having something to say, having an imagination and the ambition to do it is really all that is required. You can learn how to do anything.”

Make stuff up but keep it real

“This is imaginative work — screenwriters make things up. Everything I have in my life is a result of making things up. There is one thing that you have to know that is a deal-breaker — human behaviour. The quality of your writing will be directly related to your understanding of human behaviour. You need to become a journalist for the movie that is in your head. You need to report on it; every scene has to be real.”

Start small

“Big ideas don’t work. Start with a very small idea that you can build on. With Bourne I never read any of the books; we started again. The very smallest thing with [Jason] Bourne was, ‘If I don’t know who I am and I don’t know where I’m from, perhaps I can identify who I am by what I know how to do.’ We built a whole new world around that small idea. You just start small, you build out and you move one step after the next and that’s how you write a Hollywood movie.”

Learn to live by your wits

“My father was a screenwriter but it’s not some pixie dust creative family thing. I learned from watching how hard he worked and learned about the tempo of a writer’s life — you have to live by your wits. If you are living with someone who lives by their wits, it seems normal to you, it doesn’t scare you as much and you understand the rhythms of it.”

Write for TV

“It’s getting harder and harder to make good movies. TV is where the ambiguity and shades of reality live, it’s where stories can be interesting. A lot of writers are very excited about TV right now and it’s a writer-controlled business. When writers are in control, good things happen. They are more rational, they are hardworking, they are more benevolent. Every time writers have been put in charge of entertainment, things have worked out, so with TV maybe we will see a writer-driven utopia.”

Learn to write anywhere, anytime

“I have an office at home, I’ve written in a million hotel rooms, I can write anywhere now. My whole goal is to want to be at my desk. If the writing is going well, I don’t want to quit. I’m older and wise enough now that if something is going well, I don’t stop. I call and say I’m not coming home for dinner and just keep going. More than anything else, I want to want to go to my desk and to not be afraid of going to work.”

Get a job

“I spent six years tending bar while I figured out how to write screenplays. If you want to write, if you are a young writer and nobody knows you, find a job that pays you the most amount of money for the least amount of hours, so that you have the most amount of time left over to write. You want to live some place where you have some sort of cultural connection and can see as many films and be around as many people as possible. You want to be some place where you can just write and write and write.”

Get a life

“If you don’t have anything to say and if you haven’t done anything except see a bunch of movies, then what’s the point? You can only write what you know about and that will either limit you or open the possibilities to everything. Be interested in lots of things and stay interested. My knowledge is very wide and incredibly thin. It’s much more interesting when journalists and cops and doctors and bankers become screenwriters than 20-year-old film students. There are some exceptions, of course, but if you don’t have anything to say, then why are you here?”

Don’t live in Los Angeles

“I don’t think there is any reason to live there, I think LA is probably very bad for you. It’s a bad place to feed your head. In LA you are driving around all the time, surrounded by people who are making you depressed. I don’t think Hollywood really helps a young writer feel any sense of romance about their life. Even if it’s a delusion, you want to feel special when you go to work in the morning.”

Develop a thick skin and just keep going

“I have assumed both positions of the Hollywood Kama Sutra - top and bottom. It’s very important to be able to handle rejection. I think one of the reasons writers are shy is because we are all very suspicious of our own process because it fails so often. It’s no different from being a novelist or a composer or a painter. When you get rejection from the outside world, you either move on or you don’t. But I think the hardest times are all the days when nothing happens and everybody who has ever written anything knows what I’m talking about. A great day of writing tops everything.”

Tony Gilroy explain his simple rules for writing an original screenplay in his BAFTA Screenwriting Lecture from September 29, 2013.

Read, learn, and absorb: Tony Gilroy’s screenplay for the Michael Clayton [pdf]. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

This is required listening, Steven Soderbergh and Tony Gilroy discuss one of their favorite films, The Third Man directed by Carol Reed. This track was recorded exclusively for the Criterion Collection in 2007.

Thanks to Chris Chibnall for the heads up

“There was only one Saul Bass. He was a gentleman, a brilliant raconteur, a marvelous collaborator and, as I’ve said before, a truly great artist. And – let’s be honest – a giant.”
— Martin Scorsese

“Saul Bass wasn’t just an artist who contributed to the first several minutes of some of the greatest movies in history; in my opinion his body of work qualifies him as one of the best film makers of this, or any other time.”
— Steven Spielberg

“Bass fashioned title sequences into an art, creating in some cases, like Vertigo, a mini-film within a film. His graphic compositions in movement function as a prologue to the movie – setting the tone, providing the mood and foreshadowing the action.”
— Martin Scorsese

(Source: missavagardner, via gilliananderson)

cinephilearchive:

Academy Award-winning director Clint Eastwood in conversation with Academy Award-nominee Darren Aronofsky following the world premiere of Eastwood Directs: The Untold Story

This unprecedented new film focuses on Eastwood’s directorial method thanks to producing partners and fellow actors sharing never-before-told stories of working with Clint. It explores Eastwood’s signature style, dissecting the skills that have ensured his four decades of success.  Bringing together the insights of Martin Scorsese, Meryl Streep, Gene Hackman, Morgan Freeman and many others, the film creates the complete picture of the man, the colleague, the creator.

(via cinephilearchive)

Martin McDonagh’s follow-up to 2008’s ‘In Bruges’ confirms his place as one of the freshest and strongest new writer/director’s in cinema. A clever, hilarious, layered, piece of work that keeps you enthralled from start to finish, teetering on the edges of parody and overkill but maintaining the all-important strong character connections. 

The film follows ‘Marty’ (Colin Farrell), an Irish screenwriter in Los Angeles struggling to write his latest film. His best pal ‘Billy’ (Sam Rockwell right in his groove) is an out-of-work actor with a dog kidnapping scheme. The chemistry between Rockwell and Farrell (Marty) is superb, and Farrell once more shows he’s got just what it takes when he has inspired, strong writing to work from. Christopher Walken is refreshingly refined and delicate in his performance (strongest in years) as ‘Hans’, Billy’s 63 year-old accomplice. The group get mixed up in a hairy situation when it is revealed the Shih-Tzu Billy’s nabbed belongs to a psychopathic mob-man ‘Charlie’ (another brilliant Woody Harrelson role). And so the premise is set.

I found the film first-rate, it’s dialog once more a mix of comic interactions and truly affecting interactions between characters. It’s precisely this kind of clever, detailed writing that allows the filmmaker to tell his story with whatever form he fancies without the experience escaping (through overkill or absurdity) you, the viewer, because of how well connected to the characters you truly are. We’ve seen Quentin Tarantino inspire (to varied levels of success) a host of filmmakers since his early masterpieces but I think after about two decades we’ve finally seen something fresh, forward, and original built from the framework of what is ‘Tarantino’. His influence is felt but freshly translated. I felt genuinely elated from witnessing such a rich creation that I’d knew I’d never experienced before yet felt wholly familiar and personal. The films shooting style is contained yet compelling with some great transitions and effective editing. I thoroughly enjoyed every actors work, particularly the main trio of Farrell, Rockwell, and Walken, with a host of pleasant surprise roles including another Tom Waits gem. The violence and gore are almost always present, yet it never goes too far, and always serves it’s purpose.

It is certainly layered, with so much to say on the writing process, a parody on Hollywood and cinema itself, and on the varying ways and attitudes we go about living our lives and trying to find meaning and purpose. I applaud McDonagh for his work and eagerly anticipate his next adventure. I’d love to see yet another varied way he can expose Colin Farrell’s very appealing neurotic guise. I’m quite surprised and disappointed by the complete snub of awards attention for the film but I do believe in time we’ll only see it continue to garnish respect and praise. Another artistic piece of cinema that truly gives us a glimpse into the world of a film writer’s mind.